5 new species of fauna recorded at Pulau Ubin

5 new species of fauna recorded at Pulau Ubin

The Big-eared Pipistrelle (left) and Long-winged Tomb Bat are among the five new animal species recently recorded for Singapore. (Photo: NParks/Chung Yi Fei)
SINGAPORE: Five new species of fauna have been recorded for Singapore, the National Parks Board (NParks) said on Sunday (Jun 24). NParks discovered the species together with the research community during field surveys at Pulau Ubin last year. They include two types of bats, an insect, a bird and a spider. 
Speaking at the opening address of the seventh Ubin Day, Second Minister for National Development Desmond Lee said the discoveries are significant as they add to the diverse biodiversity at Pulau Ubin and "remind us of our role as stewards and guardians of our natural heritage". 

Migratory birds called Little Stints were spotted at the Chek Jawa wetlands in Pulau Ubin. (Photo: NParks/David Li)
The discovery of a migratory bird species called Little Stints is of particular significance, said NParks. The birds were spotted at Pulau Ubin’s Chek Jawa wetlands last September when they flew in to feed after the tide receded.
While Chek Jawa is no stranger to migratory shorebirds, NParks said that bird monitoring data collected in the past year has shown that certain species of migratory birds prefer the wetlands at Ubin over Sungei Buloh - Singapore’s other wetlands on the mainland. 
“These are significant observations as they suggest that Pulau Ubin complements Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve as another possible stopover for migratory birds along the East Asian - Australasian Flyway,” NParks said. 

The Arrow Emperor dragonfly was previously discovered only recently in Malaysia and Indonesia. (Photo: NParks/Jacky Soh)
The flyway - among the world’s most important - stretches from the arctic parts of Siberia to as far south as New Zealand. 
The other species recorded include insectivorous bats like the Long-winged Tomb Bat and the Big-eared Pipistrelle, which have previously been found in Southeast Asia. The Arrow Emperor dragonfly, which was discovered only recently in Malaysia and India, along with the Raccoon Pseudo-orb Weaver spider, were also newly added to the Singapore records. 

The Pseudo-orb Weaver spider. (Photo: Joseph K H Koh)
Ubin Day is part of Pesta Ubin, an annual month-long festival to celebrate the islands rustic charm, heritage and natural environment.
Source: CNA/hs